The Raymundo Show

Soundtrack To My Life FT: DJ EFN

August 08, 2022 Ray Gonzalez Episode 30
The Raymundo Show
Soundtrack To My Life FT: DJ EFN
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

Can you pick just one song to be the soundtrack to your life? Neither can Raymundo or his special guest DJ EFN!! We had to jump right into to this very special episode where Raymundo discusses hip hop and more with none other than the Coming Home documentary creator, cohost and creator of drink champs and fatherhoods podcast, Miami hip hop pioneer, the one and only DJ EFN! 

Tune in now!! 
Special Guest: DJ EFN

IG: @Whoscrazy, @drinkchamps ,@fatherhoodspod, @officalcrazyhood

Website: https://crazyhood.com/

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yeah. It's your host Ray Muno. Welcome to my show. Well, we do the self-help thing. With real conversations. At the same time we have a lot of fun Through laughter music. And any of the way. That can help us relate. So. We will be able to communicate. This is episode 30. The soundtrack to my life. On this episode, we basing it on hip hop. But it's time for that. Let's go let's go. And today's quote of the day comes to you, Bob, most Def. Hip hop is a beautiful culture is inspirational because it's a culture of survivors. You can create beauty out of nothingness. And that's crazy, man. Like. So many people have used. hip hop as a vehicle. To take them. Shit where they want to go. Like physically. And figuratively speak. Yeah, man, with a, whether you're in the game, like as a creator, Or you just listened to it as a fan. It has some effect on you. Like it's pumped you up before meeting that you bodied after or interview. That you really, you know, Shine like. Uh, old rapport Puffy's label. All man and the whole culture itself, man. I always feel home. No matter where I'm at. When I see graffiti. When I see. people jamming out. not having a kid in the world, reciting the lyrics. and it should always mention is. Uh, which was like part of my childhood, like where I heard the songs first. Was always in somebody's call. And the one that sticks out to me the most, I was like 12 years old, man. And Jay Z had this shit fucking rocking. All, some, all you heard was. Out of the few songs that I know. Like. From top to bottom lyrically, that's one of them. again, my girl would say otherwise, but fuck that. Want to give a quick shout out to. Prolific podcasts, Roberto and well. Holding it down for Miami yet. Yeah, but enough about the quote of the day. I'm excited for the episode. Let's get into it.

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

so on this episode of the Rayo show, we turn this shit up hip hop's such a big part of the podcast and it was only a matter of a time, before I made a whole episode about. My next guess his influence in hip hop Insane in the membrane worth the Cypress hill from killing the mix tape game to producing to marketing. pretty much, you name it. He did that shit um, on his way, if not already being the Anthony Bourdain of this hip hop doc, co-create of the fatherhood podcast. Uh, cohost and creator of the drink, champs, uh, number one, hip hop podcast. let's give it up for DJ E um, crazy production oh man. I mean, you know, before episode the preparation, uh, defines you pretty much but how you doing today, man?

efn:

I'm good. I can't complain. I'm a father, two kids and both my kids are six, so that's been the only crazy thing right now in the crib. But, uh, but everything's good. But otherwise,

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

Oh, man. I hope they feel better, man. I know, uh, when your kids are sick, that shit hurts your soul. You know what I mean?

efn:

yeah. Yeah. And also when they, my daughter's the only one that goes to school is a four she's four. And my son's too. So she's not going to school right now. Cuz she's. So that also, you know, changes the dynamic in the crib, you know? So all hands on deck, basically.

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

All that's what's up, man? The more, the more, the better cuz kids is no joke, man. I have a, I'm a dad of twins.

efn:

Oh, so you, yeah. My boy recognized my twins. Yeah.

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

yeah. Yeah. So, you know, it's a lot of work, man. Trying to find time for anything it's a blessing and you lucky.

efn:

For sure, for sure. But I mean, you know, as hard as it is as crazy, it is, the, the kids are a blessing man. And to see them smile is, is all worth, all worth the crazy shit.

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

yeah, man, they, I feel like your children's love is like the sweetest love. It's like, you know what I'm saying? There's nothing like it. I always wanted to make something to myself, but seeing those smiles, give me a motivation. That's like uncomparable, you know what I mean? So nothing on this earth. Um,

efn:

from a pure place. They don't have no agenda.

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

Yeah, man. It's it is in the DNA. You wanna be a provider, you wanna be a protector, I wanted to make you feel comfortable with this. I know this thing back here makes me, I had the Scarface. Damn it damn it. But you understand, I wanted to make you feel home. You know, I'm from New York. You know what I'm saying? I know you, uh, you cool with the new Yorkers, even though a birthed

efn:

For sure.

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

you know what I'm saying? You body in the mix tape game, it gave you like some type of like, you know what? Nah, I gotta put my on the Mac. You know what I mean?

efn:

Yeah, man, we had to, you know, we had to have that competitive spirit to keep it moving.

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

as a fact always, always, but, um, it's crazy. The first time I went to Miami was like, I think it was like 93 90. And that's where I met my girl. I was like eight years old. and I, I didn't even realize, I knew I was too young to even know that you was out there cutting the game. You know what I'm saying? Uh as a young dude yeah, and I, you know, and Miami is a great place, man. New Yorkers love it. They always posting that. They there, or they there, you know what I mean? So

efn:

Right,

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

what do you love most about living in Miami?

efn:

Oh, man, that's a double edged sword question because there's a lot of things I love about my city and, and a lot of things I don't love about my city, but, um, I love, like for example, the best time weather wise out here is wintertime. When it's winter in Miami, that's the best weather we have. It's it's drier air it's, it's cooler temperatures, and it's just beautiful days every day for stretches for weeks. but then summer. The flip side. I hate it. I hate summers in

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

All the nights everywhere.

efn:

it's hurricane season and, and man, it's, it is humid. It's nasty.

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

this shit

efn:

Like right now, we're, we're in the midst of all that. And it's the worst, but I mean, it's just a lot to love about Miami in the sense that, and I think New York can identify with it. I love the melting pot culture. I love, you know, I'm, I'm Latino. So there's, you know, plenty of LA Latino culture around me. Um, but I love, you know, I'm Latino. But I'm also Caribbean in the sense that, you know, my family comes from Cuba and that's the Caribbean. So I love the whole, all the other Caribbean influences, you know, whether it be, you know, Jamaica, The Bahamas, Haiti, Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, like all these, like, I just love that, all of that, you know? and I think that's what makes, Miami dope besides that, which is like the foundation of Miami. Then we get people coming all the time. It's a city. That welcomes immigrants, you know, in, in floods, like will have a lot of Venezuelas come through. You know, we had Colombians at one point we had, you know, Russians, even in this motherfucker, like we got all kinds of people that come and, and make Miami their home and, and it just makes, it makes the city kind of crazy in that sense, cuz it identity wise the identity shifts for the city often with the influx of different people. But I think that's, that's a dope part of the.

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

Yeah, man. when I was 29, I moved to Miami. It was like, I always wanted to live in the same state as my dad. And it, it worked out for a little bit. I really enjoyed it, man. Like I was able to embrace, My Latino, my. You understand my nationality, even though where I was, I

efn:

Your heritage,

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

yeah, my heritage. Yeah. That's that's the word I was looking for. I lived in Kendall,

efn:

Oh, that's where I'm, that's where I'm at right now.

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

Are you in

efn:

I live right. Not too far from the hammocks. The hammocks was the stomping grounds. Yeah. Yeah.

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

Yeah, um, I actually went to hammocks middle school for like a month I was supposed to go to

efn:

A bunch of people in my crew went to hams

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

Yeah.

efn:

and I went to sunset. That was the high school I, to.

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

Yeah. Yeah. I was supposed to go there and then I was supposed to come back to go to Miami. Dave didn't end up doing that, but, it was great. I learned Spanish. My Spanish was on point, I mean, and probably a little shaky now, but I was just like, uh, you know what I'm saying? Yo man, I'm, I'm gonna use out Koto. Yo. I was all over the place with this shit.

efn:

Correct?

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

um, and what I adapted though, that I still do to this day is the, the Cuban coffee, the cafe.

efn:

Yeah. Yeah.

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

I can't live without that, man. I'm yeah. That's that's that? And there's been days I've been so long energy. I've done have five of them shits as a fact.

efn:

it's just no joke, man.

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

yeah, it, it was a dope experience living in Miami. All the views. Amazing over there. You know what I mean? Uh and the people and just, you know what I'm saying, everybody, I didn't wanna have a job over there cuz I just didn't wanna do shit, but just chill out, go to the beach and enjoy the weather. I didn't wanna do none of that shit at the time. At least can't do that

efn:

Well, that's part of the mentality in Miami is, is the whole hustle mentality where nobody really wants to have a nine to five. They wanna be a hustler and have free time. And that's part of the Miami mentality.

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

Yeah, they'll take everything on a loan just to, you know what I'm saying? just to fucking live that Miami life, this next question compliments the title of the show of the episode, hip hop, the soundtrack to my life. and I was supposed to use this for another episode. I did called, uh, flavor in your ear. but it worked out cause I could use it for this one, but what song would you. Is the soundtrack to yours?

efn:

damn it's hard. To ask a DJ one song

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

No, that that's a fact. That's a

efn:

I've had so many songs in my mind,

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

but off, off top that could just, you know what I'm saying?

efn:

because the thing is when you said that three songs popped in my head that

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

let's go with the three songs they don't have actually, you know what. In the world with so much variety. Fuck one. Let me, let's get the three. Let's get the three

efn:

It'd be NWA straight outta Compton.

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

crazy motherfucker named ice cube.

efn:

uh, yeah, it'd be, uh, Cypress cell. If I could just kill a man.

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

if I can just kill a man, something. Man. That's pretty dark, bro.

efn:

it'd be public enemy fight the power. Like those three songs.

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

nah, that's that's yo that's awesome songs though, man. No.

efn:

I mean, and you say it's dark and it's real because if you, if the name of my company is crazy hook productions, and that the word crazy comes from a dark place, it comes from a mental stability place. When I created the company.

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

I can relate because, um, I feel like everyone has dark, you know, thoughts or, you know, set dark moments, but I, I got into a place where I just made it. I just made it part of me. I just made it. I just make sure I focus on the good shit. the stuff that's gonna make me feel good and reciprocate, the feeling that I want in return. So. You know what I'm saying? It's all good with me,

efn:

Right for sure. I mean, not everybody's lucky enough to get to those places. myself included, like I was able to get to a better mental place where I, I, I took a different approach to the way I looked at things.

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

So, what do you do to take care of your mental health?

efn:

I mean, I can't say I do much to take care of my mental health right now, per se, other than keep myself busy, take care of what's important, which is the family, but going backwards and just trying to, like, let's just say thinking of somebody else that might be in a dark place and then not to say. There's different levels of dark places. When I was just getting outta high school within high school, even junior high, it was a dark time for me, uh, mentally as a kid, uh, didn't wasn't raised with my pops. My pops was like, if anything was in and out sometimes. and it just, I was in a, in a crazy place. And so hip hop is kind of like what saved me in a weird way and is why I, I I'm so passionate about hip hop, why I'm so loyal to hip. and it helped me find, you know, definitions for myself. It helped me find myself through, through the culture, but hip hop was a positive thing, but still, you know, I was still finding, I still had that dark side that side where, you know, now the competitive side of hip hop and wanting to, to like, you know, just like, not hate on people, but just kind of like competing in an aggressive way is the way me and my crew started.

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

man, you wanna be

efn:

And. It got. Yeah. And it got to a point where I realized there's room really for everybody. And you, you shouldn't try to like stunt other people's growth or not help people because you feel like it's gonna hurt you. Like, I got to a place where I was like, nah, that shouldn't stop. You like help people as much as you can. Do your best to never hate on people if they're having success before you, or, or after whatever, just try to put myself in a place where just, it's not, you know, understand that that's not gonna hinder my success or hinder my growth. And once you get unlocked that, and you free yourself for that life is different, you know?

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

That's, what's something, man. You were able to like, be aware that it's there, but it would've, you know, focus on. Was gonna help you out. But, uh, speaking of hiphop and hiphop save lives, man, that's a fact, I know there's been some songs that got me through some tough times. um, what was it about hiphop that, uh, helped you capitalize on the influence it brings?

efn:

I spoke about like, when I created the name of the company, which is crazy hood productions, it's my senior year of high school. Everybody, you know, some of the kids are, are thinking they're going to college or whatever other people. Going to vocational schools. Other people are in the streets hustling, but everybody's coming out saying, okay, this is what I'm gonna do out of this. You know, it's like, you're thinking of your future when you, when you're getting outta high school. And me and, and my crew and myself, we were just die hard. Hiphop heads. We were, we were all about hip hop about the local scene. It was a big deal for us. And I just didn't, I couldn't see anything else. Like there was nothing else other than the music. Other than, than being in, in the, in the industry and the entertainment industry, which are, to me, separate things like there's hip hop culture, and then there's the industry of the culture. And then there's the entertainment industry at large, the larger entertainment industry, totally different things. I don't like to mix those things up, but if you find a happy medium for both of them and you make money doing what you loved and that's, that's the happy place.

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

Yeah, that balance.

efn:

I just couldn't see. I couldn't see anything else for myself. So I, I told my crew, I was like, look, this is what. I wanna try and pursue, creating a, a production company, not knowing what it would do. I didn't have turntables yet. I wasn't a DJ yet. I just knew I had a passion and I wanted to help advance the local hip hop scene as much as I could. And I told my boys, I was like, yo, this is what I wanna do. Every a couple people laugh. They're like, yo, that don't make no sense. Like we're in Kendall. You've been in Kendall, you know, we're, we're in Kendall. It's the early. Miami's not even on the hiphop map at all, other than two live crew and, and all in that scene. But that, that became like the base scene in Miami. But in terms of hip hop and, and lyrics and all that, like what, the type of hiphop we were into, it just didn't didn't exist. I mean, it existed, but it wasn't big Miami wasn't known for that. We didn't have an industry for that. And little less Kendall was anybody gonna come outta Kendall and do it. So a lot of people were like, nah, man, that sounds crazy. And I was like, you know what? I, I don't think it's that crazy as long. We apply ourselves and more. So my friends were like my brothers, cause I'm, I'm an only child. And I'm like, if I have my, my crew with me, if we, got numbers, like if we could support one another and do this, I don't see why anything could stop us. And, and then, you know, and it, and it happened and we did it and it didn't, it's not that it made money right away or, or even made money for a while. It, we started to see traction, we started to make noise. We started to, do things and. Every little win. We celebrated it and it created momentum for us. And, and we started to, to really make moves out here and it was, it was crazy, man. It was crazy to where we, what we started with no kind of connection to where we ended up going. But that's, I just, I couldn't see myself doing anything else to answer your question. It was just hip hop for me.

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

you said once before you gotta celebrate those small victories, man, it's important leads to the big ones and, um, it was dope. You had that moment to make that decision and give it like that laser focus, man. And when you give it that laser focus, that's where you build the foundation to do other things and share you able to do a lot, like from producing. Marketing for these record labels. And, and I, I didn't know that you wrote, uh, you said you used to write and, uh, used to rhyme and, shit. So I thought that was dope. So I'm like, yo,

efn:

Oh, yeah. Yeah. I dabbled in rhyming. I would.

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

you have some ball.

efn:

I mean, I had some, some, but I wouldn't consider myself an MC, but I was spitting on my mix tapes.

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

nah, that's dope, man. That's dope. I go from, I used to run. but I gotta try to get into the real estate side. And then I just said, you know what? So I don't have to worry about writing on a beat. I'm just gonna do poems. So if you ever get a chance to really check out the show, I have, uh, some poems that's fire. I did one for my kids recently, called Nu, uh, nothing's better than being your dad. it was pretty fire

efn:

So

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

so like Jeezy, you know what I'm saying? You wanted to put on for your city, you know what I'm saying? On, on for your. and, when did you realize that what you set out the dual was coming together?

efn:

I mean, like I said, every single win to me was. Was celebrated it to the point where I'm like, who would've thought we would've like, for example, the first thing that I did as crazier production is we did a, a local party in a warehouse, a warehouse party because there wasn't really a lot of clubs back then, you know? So any, any kind of hip hop event drew all the local hip hop heads, in the city to, to what you were doing. And we did our first event and it was a smash, it, you know, everybody from around the city came. We had an incident that got shot up, but, uh, but whatever, you know it made our name infamous in the city. You know what I'm saying? Like, like it kind for us, not to promote, shooting up parties, but

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

is popping is popping.

efn:

that's what it was. You know, when everybody went to school, they're like, yo, did you go to that party? And all the schools around the, the city. And, you know, it's, it's a time period thing. You gotta put yourself in the mentality where, or in the timeframe that this is a time where hiphop was still young and hiphop kids were like the goth kids, like there was only certain amount of hiphop kids in every high school. And so there was literally you know, like several thousands of hip hop heads in the city of Miami at the time, you know, and. We did a party. And we literally had, you know, the whole hip hop community buzzing and people were going back to their high schools like, yo, that party was wild. This was shoot out. You know how it is a fight or a shoot, like, you know, again, someone ended up did get shot, but they survived. And, and we was young. We was young and, and that was, that was the timeframe. And then the cops were like, if we ever see this CHP thing on a flyer, we're shutting you down. But it was a success. The event ended up being a success. So we did that. And then, then the next thing was music. Music was always the first goal, but the party was just to get things moving. And then I did a demo for my boy who ended up later on becoming, uh, part of another group. And he's also now the photographer for drink chance drain flicks, but I put together, well, he had a group and I was like, let me, you know, let me put this demo together. I'll, you know, I'll produce the whole demo in terms of like putting it together and get the biopic, do all this. We did this demo. We recorded at Miami day community college in their studio. we went to a convention and the demo got, you know, got picked up by Def jam. And again, UN like for us, it's like, yeah, we just, some Kendall kids, like what the fuck? And, but it ended up not getting picked the, you know, to get signed, but they picked it. From that moment, like that demo clinic they had, and we got like this letter from Def jam saying they didn't thanks for the submission we considered it, but we're not gonna accept it, but just that was a win. And so it's like all those little things I kept saying to my crew and myself, because you have to keep morale up is like, yo like again, boom, we just, some, we just, some kids from Kendall, bam, we did this party and it worked. Boom. We just, some kids from Kendall and this demo got picked up by Def. We just some kids from Kendall, we came out in an article in the source magazine. Like everything was the first of we were breaking down barriers. we were doing first OFS for the city and for ourselves. And so it wasn't about money. It was more about like these, these accolades and these props that, that we were just like, wow, this is dope. You know? And, and then, you know, later on you start to create more of the business model of how you're gonna make money. Cuz we were young minded teenagers at the time. You know, one foot in, in the street doing some stuff, some of us and one foot trying to keep it legit. And I was trying to make sure, keeping everybody clear minded on like what the mission was and let's let's, and let's do this and let's not necessarily be positive, but let's just make sure we don't taint it where, you know, like I had friends who were in the streets doing stuff and I'm like, come on, man. Like, I wanna get you out of that, you know?

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

Yeah, of course. you gotta, you gotta, you know what I'm saying? You, when you make it or you trying to make it and you see that you see the change, you wanna, you know, you want your people to feel the same thing. You know what I mean? it sucks. It's not, everybody's ready for that, but you, at least you gotta do your part in, uh, in tribe, man. when you were building your brand, can you recall like a challenging time that like it defines you to this day?

efn:

There's a lot of those, to be honest with you, or at least at least I'm not gonna say a lot. There's a handful of those moments. I'll give you one of the most, you know, the most important or impactful ones. And it was, it was around 2008, I believe around that time. Somewhere give or take a year. I got, I got Bacardi bring, but, uh, but the recession had hit and, you know, we were deep into the marketing game. We were making, we had almost every record label as a client. Uh, we were, I was selling mix taste. We, we had a record pool, we was managing art. We were like, a lot of things were going on, but the main bread and butter at that time was, was a lot of the marketing stuff we were doing it paid. And the recession came and it hit, and it devastated the industry, all industry, but what, what people, what I found out, you know, in that timeframe that when recessions come in, when there's an economic situation in the country, the first thing that gets hit is entertainment because it's a luxury and people start to pull back on doing things like going to the movies, buying music, whatever you.

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

Yeah.

efn:

a luxury. It's not something they need, they need food, they need gas. So it goes to that all their money goes to that mainly and rent and whatever. So the, the record labels started, you know, stop their budgets for what they were doing started drying up. And even like, whether it be selling mix tapes or whatever, everything we were involved in that made money started drying up. And it got to the point where like it dried all the way up because the recession had gotten that. But at that time period, I didn't look at it like as the recession was doing this, cuz I really didn't understand the economy in that way. I'm just seeing it for what's happening to me and my company and my crew. And I'm like, man, this, what did we do wrong? Like where did we fuck up? I'm thinking that we fucked up and what it, what it did teach me. And it, the, it taught me two big lessons. A, I was ready to give up everything at that point. It got so bad that it would've been a rap for anything music related, anything hiphop related. I mean, obviously it would always be a hip hop head, but in terms of the, career part of it, I was ready to give it all up because it, it all seemed, it seemed done. And imagine the people around me, family that love you and care about you. They like yo it is time to put it.

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

Yeah. They

efn:

know, this dream you're gonna do all this, these things in the music industry, like yeah. They row with you but then they're like now, like, yo, it's time to hang it up. It's time to, maybe you gotta go back to school or maybe you gotta get yourself a little regular nine to five or whatever, it's a rap. And mind you, this is 2000 like eight, like we had done so much up to that point. we were already a brand, you know, I was DJing like crazy. We had done a. So to hear that from people that care about you, it almost convinces you that, yeah, you're fucked. it's a rap. So what I had to learn there quickly is like to, to rely on my own instinct, to just put my ego, this, this also taught my ego something. It trained my ego that all this material shit, ain't nothing, man. You know, because what happens is you don't wanna go. and be, even though on, it was on a smaller local level, you don't wanna be, look like you're hurting, you know,

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

Yeah.

efn:

and I put my ego aside I just started to concentrate on how do I, uh, survive this and get out of this better. that's the work ethic part is. And the ego part is what I learned a huge lesson. And then I learned a lesson about preparing for things like. I was a young man I got at the same time, I'm getting hit with a IRS audit.

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

I have my problems with IRS and they don't fuck

efn:

I wasn't handling my taxes. I was a young man thinking they don't want my money. I need all this money. You know, I'm a independent contractor, like, ah, And they hit me hard. They hit me with a hard bill around the same time that all this is happening. So I learned to, to, you gotta handle your business. You gotta prepare, you gotta, you gotta pay attention to what's going on in the economy, even though you think it doesn't affect people on the micro level, like what's going on on the micro, is it gonna affect people on the micro and pay attention, prepare, and then stick to your guns, man? Like, if you. A vision and you, and you're confident in what you're, you know, what your vision is. Don't let nobody, even if they love you, don't let them, you know, convince you otherwise, you know,

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

That's awesome, man. I feel like a lot of people need to hear that cuz when they see you, they see what's on the surface, all this success, all this, you know, you have fun and everything and you know, you doing something you love and. is able to feed your family and you're able to do things that you weren't able to do before, because, you didn't give up and you didn't listen to those people. So hearing someone like you, uh, in your position, with your influence and inspiring people, I mean, I think that's amazing. Being part of, uh, number one, hip hop. podcast, drink champs. I feel like you gotta put that sound after this shit. like what, what would you say is like a, a behind the scene reason that the show has reached so much success? Besides it being like, I mean, it's so organic it's so like like that podcast and the fatherhood one, I feel like I'm there with. Like I'm there. I'm like, I'm like, yo right, right writing over. Right. right here.

efn:

appreciate that. I, I think first of all, we caught, we it's like one of those things where we were, it was the right time, right place for something like what we were doing to come on the scene. So I like to tell people we caught lightning in a bottle. We were just, we were kind of lucky. We were lucky, but we, we had all, both obviously Nori and myself, we had worked to the point where you make luck work for you. That's, that's how luck really works. You don't luck. Doesn't just happen. You gotta be prepared so that when something lucky happens, you can take advantage of it. So, you know, all the things got, all the things came into place for it. And I just think there was nothing out there like it like, obviously shout out to, to Juan app, to combat Jack to Joe button. To, to even iced tea who had, who had a internet radio show that was predecessor to podcasting. Like all these people in, in the hip hop space were doing podcasting. We weren't the first, but we took the approach of bringing the same conversations that we were having backstage or in the studio, drinking, smoking, whatever the same exact. Conversation style the way you talk with your homies, the way you know, you cut each other off you, you clown, you, you talking to your man here, but then your man over here did something stupid and you just stop in the middle and talk shit to him. Like we wanted to bring that because in those, in those crazy conversations there's

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

Yeah, of

efn:

real organic, authentic. Regular Q and a conversation. And I'm, and I'm not gonna tell you, we thought of it so deep, but it really was kind of like the way we wanted to do it. When you have a regular, like Q and a journalistic conversation, and we're not journalists, I don't care how many times Nori says we are. We're not journalists. Um,

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

he be on his journalist shit too. Shout out to Nori.

efn:

Yeah. Those journalistic conversations. they're very strategic conversations where people ask very S. Questions. They want a very strategic que answer back. And, you know, it's kind of like, you know, people think about what they're saying and think about what they're asking ours is a little bit more loose and, and it's supposed to be that way. And I just think people just like what you just said, people felt, and this is the consistently been the feedback by the people who love us. I mean, not by the people that hate us, but by the

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

Yeah, we don't wanna hear those.

efn:

they. They feel that they're in the room with us, they feel like it's them and their boys or the, or their, or their homegirls. They feel like they're with them shooting the shit. And that's what I think is, is why the show's successful.

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

And that's, that's the fact, that's how I felt. Right. I felt like that before now. I'm like, yo, I'm just shooting this shit with, you know what I'm saying with, you know what I'm saying? DJ you, but I know we've, uh, pretty much out of time. Um, I just wanted to thank you, man. You were on this show before. You know, it had a million followers cause we get in there. You know what I'm saying? The Rayo show, you saying we making moves, we stick it, you know, stick it to our guns, you know, like Yosemite oh, that's a good points line. you've been, not only have you been inspiration to me, but you've been an inspiration to people all over the world. shit, the culture hip hop, And, you know, I just wish you the best in everything. And I hope you continue to, uh, you know, make a difference in people's lives as a person at a time. and shit, I wanna, like I said, man, I, I appreciate every minute and every second, even the extra, but just want you to say hi to my girl real quick. And my son's sleeping, but we got my daughter. I appreciate you so much. Thank you for being on

efn:

absolutely. Nah, dope. And then we gotta have, uh, you guys on fatherhood and you could also talk about the, the line on fatherhood.

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

Yo that'd be great. That would be a honor. that'd be, that'd be great. That would be awesome, man. I would love to, um, yeah, I would love to do that, man. I already feel like I'm, I've been talking with y'all out as well. You know what I'm saying? Join the table. he's a new father of twins, so I'm sure he has a lot to say. Yeah, I got, yeah man, a lot of the things you said I was able to relate to. I'm like yo, when I don't wake up in the middle of the night, I feel bad too, man. I got I'm here with you, bro.

efn:

Yeah, man.

raymundo-the-raymundo-show:

yo, you gave me more than enough time, man. I thank you. Appreciate you. Take care, man. Yo DJ E FN in the building. Raise the roof.

The equity. More Mundo after this commercial break. Transcribing... I'm not enjoying the episode. But before we get back to it. Make sure you check out the Patrion. I got one tear. I got some content already. Every other Saturday. More content. I'm working on dropping the next two tears, uh, for next week. We make a moves over here, man. And I love the support. it's www.patrion.com/forward/the remote those show. That's though. W w.patrion.com. Forward slash the remote. No. Show. It will be in the show notes. So you got to do is click. And when you see the information All that writing. Be right there. Yeah. And my girl started a clothing line for babies. it's called Muno baby. based on nineties hip hop. shit is dope. The designs are coming together. Awesome. go support. Go cop search for your baby. have your baby and style. on social media is Muno, baby clothing. And to get the dope gear. Uh, you can The MRR for now. The website. I'll be ready soon. And that's the window baby. shop.com. I'll let y'all know. When it's live. But, um, back to the show. Yo, that was a great conversation. it was so fast, but in that short amount of time, I feel like I learned a lot. and this things that, you know, personally on my show, Mirrored a little bit from drink champs, which is a. The intros. That they give people. shit always gets me hype Shit. And you know what? I ain't going to front, man, like. When I read about successful people. You know, copying each other. I went and I took a look at the drink champs and I'm like, yo, they. As I never paid attention to it before, but I do know they really. Come on with an episode every week for the longest. And I'm like I'm over here dropping nine episode seasons. No one, the, my shit taken a minute to pop off. So, you know what I'm saying? I. Like it made me step my game up. Like you want to be great. You got to do what the greats do. People are not number one. By mistake you can get, you could become a one hit wonder. You can have a hit movie. But. I feel like that greatness, that legendary shit. Suppresses that shit all. And. Having that work ethic and. That's super focused that. That passion in. Never giving up on you. Yeah, I've decided to do this. through hip hop, man, I love hip hop. I remember being a family parties. And they will only play. You know, Spanish music. And I want to hear you. You know what I'm saying? I wanted to hear some shit. I want to hear fucking Guinea domain, the, you know what I'm saying? I don't bottle up. Aye. Aye. I love this music. But, you know what I'm saying? At the time? Like the first rapper, like I really listened to. And the first album I ever listened to from start to finish. I was a LL cool. J's mama said, knock you out. Cause I remember telling my dad I'm like, y'all want to be a rapper. He sent me all these CDs. And I ain't going from, I liked none of them shit. Cause some, some shits he sent me, I was like, now pops, you ain't, you ain't know the game that much. Yeah. I mean, he's on the, he's on the Spanish side of it. But, yeah, man, I remember. I learned the lyrics to, uh, um, around the way girl and we was in the car and he was like, yo, let me hear something. I was like nine years old. When I remember I was just like, I want a girl with extensions in her hair, bamboo earrings, the least two pair offend the bag in the bad attitude. That's what I need to get me in a good mood. But I floated like a rapper. Like my dad was like, surprised as shit. That was a dope moment. But yeah, man, everything I do. Don't get me wrong. I know I listen to everything, but there's always like a hip hop track in the background. The three songs I will pick to the soundtrack of my life right now. Would be I ain't going to front. And now that I'm thinking about it, like. I'm like, that's a fucked up questions to ask because this man songs like, and he's a DJ. So imagine. And me i'm over here like you know something i have to pause real quick i'll be right back No pun intended, but I had to dig into that crates, footies three. Well, these are for like lining up perfectly where I'm at right now. Uh, the first one is, anything. the second one would be. Microphone theme. Uh, Eric B and Rakim. I was a fiend. Before I became a teen, music. So when hip hop was originated, Because I feel like a microphone. Right now with this podcast. I so gets me hype. And the third song is going to be, Tom, for some action. Bob Graham man, who's a legend in the rap game. And definitely one of them on my show. by the end of this year, What is a lot of things in the mix. Still a lot of shit. I gotta do. And I got no time. The WACE. oh man yeah, man. That's the songs. Cause you know, the family, the. You know, my people. The microphone. It's going to take me places. I dreamed of. you know, the hall work and, uh, the determination on, uh, on a billion. You going to see the show on a billboard? On the magazine. Um, or you're going to send me with that blue check yet. And I didn't talk about Nike. Come on man. I mean, what else do you think of when you think about a check? I mean money, but you know, We took them about the culture right now. Yeah, man. But. I love hip hop. like I said, I already have it incorporated in the show, but. I'm gonna try to add it to my self help. Because we, from what you heard from the show, it helped him. With his life. Maybe I could show you a way to hip hop can help you with yours. And we go all, Rock out the hip hop together. Erin cause. This is some songs that's undeniably great in. You have no choice, but the move your feet. Oh, Bob, your head. like that will Smith song. Nobody remembers. Uh, blacks. Come in. Oh man, but y'all already know. Let's get into that final say in. Hip hop can take you to another time like quantum leap, put you in that place in your mind where you wanna be from B I G to Cypress hill, when LA hill it got something for your soul. If you need to heal AUM times, you feel numb and you need to feel a certain lyric can make you think you on Dr. Phil. But now it's Dr. Dre when he was on death row or NWA. Oh, daughter's crying. But like mob de sometimes you want to get away. You're a song away. All you gotta do is press play like them bullies did in house party. But anyway, I'm sorry, Ms. Jackson. I am, for real, no way. Hip hop could ever die. Cause like babe big kids in bothies. And as long as the streets is alive, hip hop will forever be Supreme and not the drug dealer from Queens it was all a dream. And it's only a matter of a time before you see my show on the billboard or magazine. Yeah, man, what I want y'all to do right now, once this episode finishes, we want you. Put on your favorite hip hop song that you know, all the lyrics to and jam the fuck out. I'm talking about, you know what I'm saying? Be there, you know what I'm saying? Be in the video, be where you was at when you was listening to it and experience how great that feeling is that you don't even realize, you know, it could take you out the most stressful mood, you know what I mean? There's other genres that could do the same shit, but I know man, hip hop has always been the main source for me. You know what I'm saying? Right after salsa. You know what I mean? Believe it or not, you know, then some Beata, Lil belt pop pop, pop, pop. I ain't talking about the serial dude. Yeah, man, but I wanna thank y'all for tuning into the Raymundo show. Another great episode. I want to thank DJ E F N for showing some love and just being so humble. The whole process. I appreciate that. He gave me like that respect. From the communication to being a on, on a number one podcast and coming to this show, that's eventually gonna be number one, one day, man. I will always appreciate that shit, shit. And he's show me no matter how famous or popular you are showing love is universal, but we building over here, man. You know what I'm saying? Brick by. The Raymundo show, baby, we taken off like a satellite but till next time, peace, love Mundo out